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Japanese Americans and the U.S. Constitution: Topic 1 - Immigration
Section of the A More Perfect Union online exhibit focusing on the experience of Issei, the first generation of Japanese immigrants to the United States, through the use of artifacts from the Museum's collections, primary source documents, photographs, and oral histories. Most Japanese immigrants to Hawaii and the mainland United States faced severe racial prejudice and restrictive laws specifically aimed to limit the rights of Asian immigrants to own property and become citizens. Also discussed are the challenges later immigrants to both Hawaii and California faced as racist attitudes and policies were legalized.
Provider: National Museum of American History
State Standards: View state standards for this resource
Grade(s): General audience
Overall Rating:  

Japanese Americans and the U.S. Constitution: Topic 2 - Removal
Section of the A More Perfect Union online exhibit focused on how the attack on Pearl Harbor led to Executive Order 9066, which was the first step in a program that uprooted Japanese Americans from their West Coast communities and placed them under armed guard for up to four years. This section uses artifacts from the Museum's collections, primary source documents, photographs and oral histories to discuss the early stages of this traumatic period, from the initial reactions and policies brought about by the attack on Pearl Harbor to the temporary assembly centers that were the first stop for Japanese American internees.
Provider: National Museum of American History
Grade(s): General audience
Overall Rating:  

Japanese Americans and the U.S. Constitution: Topic 3 - Internment
Section of the A More Perfect Union online exhibit focused on everyday life in Japanese American internment camps during World War II. Living in geographically isolated camps under harsh conditions and laboring for unfair wages, internees recreated a community structure that enabled them to live as normal a life as possible as well as thrive culturally. Artifacts from the Museum's collections, fine art, primary source documents, photographs and oral histories provide a sense of the daily life of internees as well as an appreciation for the unique art and culture that emerged from the rigors of life in the camps.
Provider: National Museum of American History
Grade(s): General audience
Overall Rating:  

Japanese Americans and the U.S. Constitution: Topic 4 – Loyalty
Section of the A More Perfect Union online exhibit focused on how the loyalty of Japanese Americans was tested during World War II. Based on answers to mandatory loyalty questionnaires, many Japanese Americans were sent to separate camps, repatriated, expatriated or given the opportunity to be drafted into the military. This section includes artifacts from the Museum' collections, primary source documents, photographs and oral histories.
Provider: National Museum of American History
Grade(s): General audience
Overall Rating:  

Japanese Americans and the U.S. Constitution: Topic 5 – Service
Section the A More Perfect Union online exhibit focused on the 25,000 Japanese Americans who served in U.S. military units during World War II. This section uses artifacts from the Museum's collections, primary source documents, photographs and oral histories to tell the stories of the military service and sacrifice of these brave men as well as the irony that they were fighting to preserve the world's freedom while their families were imprisoned. Their combat record aided the post-war acceptance of Japanese Americans in American society and helped many people to recognize the injustice of wartime internment.
Provider: National Museum of American History
Overall Rating:  

Japanese Americans and the U.S. Constitution: Topic 6 – Justice
Section of the A More Perfect Union online exhibit focused on the efforts of Japanese Americans to receive justice after their internment during World War II. This section uses artifacts from the Museum's collections, primary source documents, photographs and oral histories to discuss the court cases brought against the government, the formal apologies and efforts of redress by the government and the successes of members of the Japanese American community in post-war United States.
Provider: National Museum of American History
Grade(s): General audience
Overall Rating:  

Oh Freedom! Teaching African American Civil Rights through American Art at the Smithsonian
Interactive website that offers fresh ways of teaching about the Civil Rights Movement by making connections between history and art. It includes nearly 40 artworks, from a 1908 portrait of Booker T. Washington to the “Hope” portrait of President Obama. Web 2.0 tools bring teachers together to discuss the materials and to share lesson plans and activities.
Provider: Smithsonian American Art Museum
State Standards: View state standards for this resource
Grade(s): 4–8, 9–12
Overall Rating:  

Reading Baseball Saved Us
Lesson has children read information about the book Baseball Saved Us, its author and its illustrator. Includes images of objects from the online exhibit A More Perfect Union: Japanese Americans and the U.S. Constitution. Part of the “Life in a WWII Japanese American Internment Camp” resource.
Provider: National Museum of American History
Grade(s): PreK–3
Overall Rating:  

Resources - A More Perfect Union: Japanese-Americans and the U.S. Constitution
Reference webpage with links to all of the resources included in the online exhibit A More Perfect Union. This page serves as a resource on the Japanese American Internment camps of World War II. Included are links to a statement by one of the exhibition's curators and the text of the original traveling exhibition A More Perfect Union: Japanese Americans and The United States Constitution, as well as a historical overview of the period, two classroom activities, a bibliography of books for grades 4 through 12, and a list of relevant web sites about Japanese and Asian American culture and history.
Provider: National Museum of American History
Grade(s): General audience
Overall Rating:  

Segregated America
Online exhibit showing how racism, manifested in social attitudes and policies such as Jim Crow laws and poll taxes, led to the Plessy v. Ferguson case legalizing segregation. Segregated America is the first section of the online exhibition entitled Separate is Not Equal: Brown v. Board of Education. Targets grades 6-12.
Provider: National Museum of American History
Grade(s): 4–8, 9–12
Overall Rating:  

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