FOSSIL HUNTER
Conrad Labandeira

ABOUT CONRAD

profile

Conrad Labandeira, a paleoecologist at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, was raised on his family's farm in the San Joaquin Valley of central California. All farmers must take an interest in the ways insect life affects plant life. Conrad carried this interest into a career as a specialist in insect-plant relationships in the fossil record. His research has focused on those relationships after mass extinctions like the end-Cretaceous event, which destroyed the dinosaurs and much other life in the oceans and on land. Behind all of his work, he says, is the basic question: How did insects and plants come to dominate life on land?

Conrad has an M.S. from the University of Wisconsin and a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. He has been at the Smithsonian since 1992.

VIDEOS WITH CONRAD

video
PURE, ABJECT CURIOSITY
CLUES TO THE END-PERMIAN EXTINCTION
THE WRONG SIDE OF THE PLANET

EXTRAS

extras

Check out the Department of Paleobiology at the National Museum of Natural History.

Explore the Smithsonian's Guide to Insect Damage Types.